IT STICKS WITH THEM, WHEREVER THEY MAY GO. THE ONLY CLASS 1 CORTICOSTEROID IN A TAPE.1,2

A woman jogging while wearing Cordran Tape on her arm

IT STICKS. IT STAYS. IT WORKS.*

*CORDRAN Tape should be applied on clean and dry skin. It should always be cut, never torn. Topical corticosteroids are contraindicated in patients with a history of hypersensitivity to any of the components of these preparations. CORDRAN Tape is not recommended for lesions exuding serum or in intertriginous areas. Replacement of the tape every 12 hours produces the lowest incidence of adverse reactions, but it may be left in place for 24 hours if it is well tolerated and adheres satisfactorily. If irritation or infection develops, the use of CORDRAN Tape should be discontinued and appropriate antimicrobial therapy instituted, as necessary.3

Not an actual patient, results may vary.

THE ONLY CLASS 1 TOPICAL CORTICOSTEROID TAPE.1,2

FEATURES

CORDRAN TAPE CAN PROVIDE VISIBLE RESULTS IN AS LITTLE AS ONE WEEK.4

Icon depicting an application of Cordran Tape
TRANSPARENT, MEDICATED OCCLUSIVE SKIN BARRIER.3
Icon depicting a number of places where Cordran Tape can be applied on the body
VERSATILE FOR DIFFICULT-TO-TREAT AREAS (FINGERTIPS, ELBOWS, KNEES).2
Icon depicting Cordran Tape's flexibility
FLEXIBLE LIKE ATHLETIC TAPE.3
Clock icon
CAN BE WORN UP TO 24 HOURS.3*

ADMINISTRATION

CORDRAN TAPE CAN BE CUT TO FIT.

PATIENTS NEED TO ONLY APPLY A PIECE SLIGHTLY LARGER THAN THEIR TREATMENT AREA.3

CORDRAN TAPE IS 3 INCHES WIDE AND OVER 6 AND A HALF FEET LONG!3

Since patients can apply it to their treatment sites for up to 24 hours,* one roll of CORDRAN Tape can last a long time, even in patients with dermatoses that have recurring flare-ups.

*Replacement of the tape every 12 hours produces the lowest incidence of adverse reactions, but it may be left in place for 24 hours if it is well tolerated and adheres satisfactorily. If irritation or infection develops, the use of CORDRAN Tape should be discontinued and appropriate antimicrobial therapy instituted, as necessary.3

PSORIASIS2
Psoriasis
  • Description: dry, raised, red skin lesions (plaques) covered with silvery scales.5
  • Est. prevalence: 7 million Americans.5
ATOPIC DERMATITIS
(ECZEMA)2
Atopic Dermatitis
  • Description: red, dry, itchy skin that can occur inside the elbows and knees. Common in children but can occur at any age.5
  • Est. prevalence: 33-39 million American children; 3 million American adults.5
PRURIGO NODULARIS
(PICKER’S BUMPS)6
Prurigo Nodularis
  • Description: multiple, firm, flesh to pink colored nodules commonly located on the extensor surfaces of the extremities.6
  • Est. prevalence: can occur at any age, but most common in middle-aged and older adults.5
LICHEN SIMPLEX CHRONICUS
(LSC)2
Lichen Simplex Chronicus
  • Description: dry, scaly areas that are patchy and thick.7
  • Est. prevalence: 39 million Americans.7
ALLERGIC CONTACT DERMATITIS8
Allergic Contact Dermatitis
  • Description: a red, itchy rash caused by an allergic reaction to a substance.9
  • Est. prevalence: 4.45 million Americans.5
NUMMULAR DERMATITIS2
Nummular Dermatitis
  • Description: distinct, coin-shaped or oval sores.5
  • Est. prevalence: 650,000 Americans.5
PARONYCHIA10
Paronchyia
  • Description: localized, superficial infections or abscesses of the skin around the nails.5
  • Est. prevalence: the most common hand infection (35% of all cases).11
HAND DERMATITIS2
Hand Dermatitis
  • Description: symptoms include redness, itching, pain, dryness, cracks, and blisters.12
  • Est. prevalence: 33 million Americans.12
STICK IT TO PSORIASIS AND OTHER CORTICOSTEROID-RESPONSIVE DERMATOSES.2,3

HOW DO TOPICALS (CREAMS, LOTIONS, AND OINTMENTS) MEASURE UP? CORDRAN TAPE MIGHT TICK THE RIGHT BOXES WHEN YOU CONSIDER:

  • Topical steroids can rub off on clothing or bedsheets.
  • The delivery mechanism of some topical steroids does not provide a physical and protective barrier.

ALTERNATIVE TREATMENTS SUCH AS CRYOSURGERY HAVE VARYING DEGREES OF SUCCESS, AND REQUIRE THAT TREATMENT START ONLY WITH SMALL LESIONS.13

  • There are no age limitations with CORDRAN Tape.3

    • Pediatric patients may absorb proportionately larger amounts of topical corticosteroids and thus may be more susceptible to systemic toxicity.3
    • Administration of topical corticosteroids to pediatric patients should be limited to the least amount compatible with an effective therapeutic regimen.3
    • Chronic corticosteroid therapy may interfere with the growth and development of pediatric patients.3
  • No mess, just stick and go!3

A boy playing soccer, with Cordran Tape on his knee
A boy playing soccer, with Cordran Tape on his knee

Not an actual patient, results may vary.

PATIENT ACCESS

NOW OFFERING IMPROVED ACCESS.

Almirall Advantage savings card

AFFORDABLE ACCESS WITH ALMIRALL ADVANTAGE.

Assistance is now available for eligible patients with commercial (non-government) insurance only. Terms and conditions may apply.

START SAVING

CORDRAN TAPE OFFERS A GREAT VALUE FOR PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC RECURRING CORTICOSTEROID-RESPONSIVE DERMATOSES.

CORDRAN AND YOUR PATIENTS

IT STICKS TO LIFE.

PATIENT PROFILE 0 / 03

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

INDICATIONS AND USAGE

CORDRAN® Tape (Flurandrenolide Tape, USP) is a corticosteroid indicated for the relief of the inflammatory and pruritic manifestations of corticosteroid responsive dermatoses, particularly dry, scaling localized lesions.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Topical corticosteroids are contraindicated in patients with a history of hypersensitivity to any of the components of these preparations. Use of CORDRAN® Tape is not recommended for lesions exuding serum or in intertriginous areas.

Systemic absorption of topical corticosteroids has produced reversible hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression, manifestations of Cushing’s syndrome, hyperglycemia, and glucosuria in some patients. Use over large surface areas, prolonged use, and the addition of occlusive dressings augment systemic absorption. Pediatric patients may absorb proportionately larger amounts of topical corticosteroids and thus may be more susceptible to systemic toxicity.

HPA axis suppression, Cushing’s syndrome, and intracranial hypertension have been reported in pediatric patients receiving topical corticosteroids. Patients receiving a large dose applied to a large surface area should be evaluated periodically for evidence of HPA axis suppression, and therapy should be modified or discontinued as appropriate.

Topical corticosteroids should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. Drugs of this class should not be used extensively for pregnant patients or in large amounts or for prolonged periods of time. Caution should be exercised when topical corticosteroids are administered to a nursing woman.

Local adverse reactions may occur more frequently with the use of occlusive dressings. These reactions are listed in approximate decreasing order of occurrence: burning, itching, irritation, dryness, folliculitis, hypertrichosis, acneiform eruptions, hypopigmentation, perioral dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis. Reactions that may occur more frequently with occlusive dressings include: maceration of the skin, secondary infection, skin atrophy, striae, and miliaria.

For more information on CORDRAN® Tape, please see accompanying Full Prescribing Information.

To report an adverse event or product complaint, call or email:
Medical Affairs and Customer Relations
Phone: 1-866-665-2782
Fax: 510-595-8183
Email: almirallmc@eversana.com



REFERENCES:

  1. US Department of Health and Human Services. Orange Book: Approved Drug Products with Therapeutic Equivalence Evaluations. 39th ed. US Food and Drug Administration; 2019. https://www.fda.gov/drugs/informationondrugs/ucm129662.htm. Accessed April 9, 2019.
  2. Ference JD, Last AR. Choosing topical corticosteroids. Am Fam Physician. 2009;79(2):135-140.
  3. CORDRAN Tape [package insert]. Exton, PA: Almirall, LLC, 2018.
  4. Weiner MA. Flurandrenolone tape. A new preparation for occlusive therapy. J Invest Dermatol. 1966;47(1):63-66.
  5. Medscape. Latest Medical News, Clinical Trials, Guidelines – Today on Medscape. Medscape.com. https://www.medscape.com. Accessed May 16, 2019.
  6. Mullins TB, Sharma P, Sonthalia S. Prurigo Nodularis. Treasure Island, FL: StatPearls Publishing; 2019.
  7. Charifa A, Badri T. Lichen Simplex Chronicus. Treasure Island, FL: StatPearls Publishing; 2019.
  8. Fonacier L, Bernstein DI, Pacheco K, et al. Contact dermatitis: a practice parameter-update 2015. J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract. 2015;3(3 Suppl):S1-39.
  9. Pongdee T. Contact Dermatitis Overview. American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology. https://www.aaaai.org/conditions-and-treatments/library/allergy-library/contact-dermatitis. Accessed June 25, 2019.
  10. Leggit JC. Acute and chronic paronychia. Am Fam Physician. 2017;96(1):44-51.
  11. Mayeaux EJ Jr. Paronychia. In: Usatine RP, Smith MA, Mayeaux EJ Jr., Chumley HS, eds. The Color Atlas and Synopsis of Family Medicine. 3rd ed. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; 2018:1287-1291.
  12. Hand Eczema. National Eczema Association. https://nationaleczema.org/eczema/types-of-eczema/hand-eczema. Accessed May 30, 2019.
  13. Abyaneh MAY, Griffith R, Falto-Aizpura L, Nouri K. Cryosurgery for psoriasis. In: Abramovits W, Graham G, Har-Shai Y, Strumia R, eds. Dermatological Cryosurgery and Cryotherapy. London, UK: Springer Verlag; 2016. https://www.springer.com/us/book/9781447167648.