DR. TED LAIN DISCUSSES HIS EXPERIENCE USING CORDRAN TAPE.

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This video is for professional and education purposes only. Please see Important Safety Information throughout and in Chapter 6 of this video.

Play Chapter 1

CHAPTER 1 WHAT IS CORDRAN TAPE?

  • Patient benefits
  • Patient types
  • Difficult-to-treat areas
Play Chapter 2

CHAPTER 2 DOSING & CONTRAINDICATIONS

  • Dosing and administration
  • Contraindications and precautions
  • Long-term use and areas to avoid
Play Chapter 3

CHAPTER 3 STARTING AND DIRECTIONS FOR USE

  • Starting treatment with CORDRAN Tape
  • Directions for CORDRAN Tape use
  • Reapplying CORDRAN Tape
  • Applying CORDRAN Tape to high-movement areas
Play Chapter 4

CHAPTER 4 TREAT A VARIETY OF CONDITIONS

  • Contact dermatitis1
  • Hand dermatitis2
  • Psoriasis2
  • Lichen simplex chronicus (LSC)2
  • Prurigo nodularis3
  • Number of treatments per roll
Play Chapter 5

CHAPTER 5 PATIENT ACCESS & SUCCESS STORIES

  • Patient access
  • Success stories

References:

  1. Fonacier L, Bernstein DI, Pacheco K, et al. Contact dermatitis: a practice parameter-update 2015. J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract. 2015;3(3 Suppl):S1-39.
  2. Ference JD, Last AR. Choosing topical corticosteroids. Am Fam Physician. 2009;79(2):135-140.
  3. Mullins TB, Sharma P, Sonthalia S. Prurigo Nodularis. Treasure Island, FL: StatPearls Publishing; 2019.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

INDICATIONS AND USAGE

CORDRAN® Tape (Flurandrenolide Tape, USP) is a corticosteroid indicated for the relief of the inflammatory and pruritic manifestations of corticosteroid responsive dermatoses, particularly dry, scaling localized lesions.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Topical corticosteroids are contraindicated in patients with a history of hypersensitivity to any of the components of these preparations. Use of CORDRAN® Tape is not recommended for lesions exuding serum or in intertriginous areas.

Systemic absorption of topical corticosteroids has produced reversible hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression, manifestations of Cushing’s syndrome, hyperglycemia, and glucosuria in some patients. Use over large surface areas, prolonged use, and the addition of occlusive dressings augment systemic absorption. Pediatric patients may absorb proportionately larger amounts of topical corticosteroids and thus may be more susceptible to systemic toxicity.

HPA axis suppression, Cushing’s syndrome, and intracranial hypertension have been reported in pediatric patients receiving topical corticosteroids. Patients receiving a large dose applied to a large surface area should be evaluated periodically for evidence of HPA axis suppression, and therapy should be modified or discontinued as appropriate.

Topical corticosteroids should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. Drugs of this class should not be used extensively for pregnant patients or in large amounts or for prolonged periods of time. Caution should be exercised when topical corticosteroids are administered to a nursing woman.

Local adverse reactions may occur more frequently with the use of occlusive dressings. These reactions are listed in approximate decreasing order of occurrence: burning, itching, irritation, dryness, folliculitis, hypertrichosis, acneiform eruptions, hypopigmentation, perioral dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis. Reactions that may occur more frequently with occlusive dressings include: maceration of the skin, secondary infection, skin atrophy, striae, and miliaria.

For more information on CORDRAN® Tape, please see accompanying Full Prescribing Information.

To report an adverse event or product complaint, call or email:
Medical Affairs and Customer Relations
Phone: 1-866-665-2782
Fax: 510-595-8183
Email: almirallmc@eversana.com



REFERENCES:

  1. US Department of Health and Human Services. Orange Book: Approved Drug Products with Therapeutic Equivalence Evaluations. 39th ed. US Food and Drug Administration; 2019. https://www.fda.gov/drugs/informationondrugs/ucm129662.htm. Accessed April 9, 2019.
  2. Ference JD, Last AR. Choosing topical corticosteroids. Am Fam Physician. 2009;79(2):135-140.
  3. CORDRAN Tape [package insert]. Exton, PA: Almirall, LLC, 2018.
  4. Weiner MA. Flurandrenolone tape. A new preparation for occlusive therapy. J Invest Dermatol. 1966;47(1):63-66.
  5. Medscape. Latest Medical News, Clinical Trials, Guidelines – Today on Medscape. Medscape.com. https://www.medscape.com. Accessed May 16, 2019.
  6. Mullins TB, Sharma P, Sonthalia S. Prurigo Nodularis. Treasure Island, FL: StatPearls Publishing; 2019.
  7. Charifa A, Badri T. Lichen Simplex Chronicus. Treasure Island, FL: StatPearls Publishing; 2019.
  8. Fonacier L, Bernstein DI, Pacheco K, et al. Contact dermatitis: a practice parameter-update 2015. J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract. 2015;3(3 Suppl):S1-39.
  9. Pongdee T. Contact Dermatitis Overview. American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology. https://www.aaaai.org/conditions-and-treatments/library/allergy-library/contact-dermatitis. Accessed June 25, 2019.
  10. Leggit JC. Acute and chronic paronychia. Am Fam Physician. 2017;96(1):44-51.
  11. Mayeaux EJ Jr. Paronychia. In: Usatine RP, Smith MA, Mayeaux EJ Jr., Chumley HS, eds. The Color Atlas and Synopsis of Family Medicine. 3rd ed. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; 2018:1287-1291.
  12. Hand Eczema. National Eczema Association. https://nationaleczema.org/eczema/types-of-eczema/hand-eczema. Accessed May 30, 2019.
  13. Abyaneh MAY, Griffith R, Falto-Aizpura L, Nouri K. Cryosurgery for psoriasis. In: Abramovits W, Graham G, Har-Shai Y, Strumia R, eds. Dermatological Cryosurgery and Cryotherapy. London, UK: Springer Verlag; 2016. https://www.springer.com/us/book/9781447167648.